Fisheries Lake Survey

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Name: Eagle

Nearest Town: Maple Grove
Primary County: Hennepin
Survey Date: 07/25/2011
Inventory Number: 27011101
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Public Access Information

Ownership Type Description
DNR Gravel


Lake Characteristics

Lake Area (acres): 287.21
Littoral Area (acres): 199.1
Maximum Depth (ft): 34
Water Clarity (ft): 6.1 (5.75-6.5)

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A


Did you know? The annual budget for the Section of Fisheries is approximately $17 million, which is funded primarily by fishing license and stamp fees and by a federal excise tax on fishing and boating equipment.

Fish Sampled for the 2011 Survey Year

Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Crappie Trap net 3.00 1.8 - 21.2 0.20 0.2 - 0.3
Gill net 5.83 2.5 - 16.5 0.18 0.1 - 0.3
Bluegill Trap net 23.12 7.5 - 62.5 0.12 0.1 - 0.3
Gill net 20.67 N/A 0.12 N/A
Common Carp Trap net 0.12 0.4 - 2.0 19.74 2.6 - 6.0
Golden Shiner Gill net 1.83 0.3 - 1.5 0.11 0.1 - 0.1
Green Sunfish Trap net 0.12 0.2 - 1.3 0.10 0.1 - 0.2
Hybrid Sunfish Trap net 0.50 N/A 0.31 N/A
Largemouth Bass Trap net 0.12 0.2 - 0.7 0.10 0.2 - 0.9
Gill net 0.17 0.3 - 0.8 0.06 0.4 - 1.0
Muskellunge Gill net 0.17 0.2 - 1.0 10.39 1.9 - 4.0
Northern Pike Trap net 1.00 N/A 2.14 N/A
Gill net 3.67 1.5 - 7.3 4.50 2.0 - 3.5
Pumpkinseed Trap net 0.75 0.7 - 4.2 0.08 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 0.17 N/A 0.12 N/A
Walleye Gill net 0.50 1.2 - 6.3 3.13 1.2 - 2.7
Yellow Bullhead Trap net 0.12 0.9 - 5.7 0.29 0.5 - 0.8
Yellow Perch Trap net 0.12 0.3 - 1.7 0.14 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 11.50 2.0 - 27.9 0.13 0.1 - 0.2
Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.


Length of Selected Species (Trapnet, Gillnet) Sampled for the 2011 Survey Year

Species Number of fish caught in each category (inches)
0-5 6-8 9-11 12-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30+ Total
black crappie 8 51 0 0 0 0 0 0 59
bluegill 223 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 309
common carp 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
golden shiner 1 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 11
green sunfish 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
hybrid sunfish 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
largemouth bass 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
muskellunge 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
northern pike 0 0 0 2 3 6 13 6 30
pumpkinseed 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
walleye 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3
yellow bullhead 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
yellow perch 15 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 70


For the record, the largest Walleye-Sauger Hybrid taken in Minnesota weighed 9 lbs., 13.4 oz. and was caught:

    Where: Mississippi River near Red Wing, Goodhue County
    When: 3/20/99
    Statistics: 27" length, 17.75" girth

Fish Stocking Activity

Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years

Year Species Size Number Pounds
2013 Walleye fingerlings 269 13.0
  Walleye fingerlings 6,502 448.0
2012 Muskellunge fingerlings 370 69.1
  Muskellunge* fingerlings 30 4.5
  Walleye yearlings 9,914 404.0
2009 Walleye fingerlings 2,838 129.0
  Walleye fingerlings 1,064 304.0
2008 Muskellunge fingerlings 30 6.3
  Muskellunge* fingerlings 300 66.7
  Muskellunge* fingerlings 30 1.0
2007 Walleye fingerlings 5,153 257.7
2004 Muskellunge* fingerlings 400 61.7

Privately Stocked Fish
* indicates privately stocked fish. Private stocking includes fish purchased by the DNR for stocking and fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.

Stocking Fish Sizes
Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.
Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.
Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.
Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines

No fish consumption guidelines are available for this lake. For more information, see the "Fish Consumption Advice" pages at the Minnesota Department of Health.


Status of the Fishery (as of 07/25/2011)

Eagle Lake is a productive 291-acre lake located in Maple Grove. There is a DNR-owned public access on the northeast corner of the lake. Muskellunge and walleye are the primary species of management and the lake is secondarily managed for largemouth bass. The lake is stocked biennially with walleye and muskellunge on alternating years. In July 2011, a population assessment was conducted to determine the size structure and abundance of game fish in the lake.

Muskellunge are not effectively sampled with the gear used in the summer population assessments. However, one 35-inch muskellunge was captured. In the spring of 2008, an ice-out muskellunge population assessment was conducted with large trap nets. In this assessment, 40 adult muskellunge (11 females and 29 males) were collected. Female muskellunge averaged 46.0 inches and 23.5 pounds, with the largest individual captured measuring 49.8 inches. Male muskellunge averaged 39.1 inches and 13.6 pounds with the largest individual captured measuring 44.3 inches. Five year-classes were represented in the trapnet catch (1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, and 2002) with age 14 fish being the oldest sampled. An estimated 163 adult muskellunge live in Eagle lake, which equates to 0.56 adult muskellunge per acre.

Historically, walleye abundance in Eagle Lake has been as high as 7.8 per gill net and averages 3.5 per net. However in the summer assessment of 2011, 3 walleye were sampled at a rate of 0.50 per net. This is the lowest recorded abundance of the previous nine assessments. Currently a study is being implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of different walleye stocking strategies in moderate sized (200-1000 acre; Class 23, 24, 25, and 31) Minnesota lakes. The three walleye sampled were 20.5, 20.6, and 22.7 inches and averaged 3.1 lbs. One was age-6, the other two were age-8.

Two largemouth bass were collected during the assessment; however, passive sampling gears, such as trap nets and gill nets, are not effective methods for collecting largemouth bass. The data presented for this species is not indicative of relative abundance or size structure. Electrofishing is the typical method for largemouth bass assessments but was not conducted during this survey. The two bass were 5.4 and 6.2 inches in length. A largemouth bass fishery is present in Eagle Lake, but the true status of the population can't be determined from this survey's small sample size.

Northern pike were found at median levels (3.7/gill net) and below the long term average of 7.1 per net. Pike averaged 27.1 inches and 4.5 lbs, with the largest measuring 32.9 inches and 5.9 lbs. Ninety-three percent were 14 inches or longer, 83% were 21 inches or longer, and 36% were 28 inches or longer. Overall, northern pike were in fair body condition. Ages ranged from 2 to 9, with the 2005 and 2006 year classes representing 53% of the population. Northern pike grew relatively fast compared to statewide averages. Pike were 18.5 inches by age 3, 24 inches by age 5, and 30 inches by age 7.

Black crappie abundance has varied over previous assessments ranging from 0.5 to 63.0/gill net and averaging 10.8/gill net. The same trend is true of trap net catch. Currently the population is near Lake Class median levels (5.83/gill net) compared to other similar lakes. For all fish sampled, black crappie averaged 7.1 inches and 0.17 lbs, with the largest measuring 8.8 inches and 0.34 lbs. Eighty-six percent were 5 inches or longer, and 32% were 8 inches or longer. Crappie were in fair body condition, with the smaller fish in better condition than the larger. Black crappie ranged in age from 1 through 6; however 59% were from the 2007 (age 4) year class. Growth was near average, where fish were 6.9 inches by age 3, and 8.1 inches by age 5.

Bluegill abundance is moderate (23.1 per trap net) and has remained relatively stable over the previous 4 assessments (mean = 33.9/trap net). In 2011, bluegill averaged 5.4 inches and 0.12 lbs. The largest measured was 7.4 inches and 0.26 lbs. Twenty-seven percent were 6 inches or longer. Bluegill were in fair body condition, with the smaller fish in better condition than the larger. Bluegill ranged in age from 1 through 6 with the majority (53%) age 4 (2007 year class). Thirty-eight percent were relatively equally divided among the 2006 and 2008 year classes. Bluegill growth was near the state average, with fish reaching 4.6 inches by age 3 and 6.6 inches by age 5.

Yellow perch abundance has been decreasing since 2004 (3 assessments since that time, mean = 35/gill net), but is still at a moderate level (11.5/gill net). Yellow perch size structure is small, averaging 6.6 inches and 0.13 lbs, with the largest measuring 8.0 inches and 0.20 lbs. Yellow perch were in fair body condition and condition did not vary by fish size. Four year classes of yellow perch were sampled. Age-4 perch were the most common (80%), followed by age 3 (14%), age 2 (4%), and age 7 (1%). Growth was near the statewide average except for the age-7 individual ,where growth was slow. Perch reached 5.7 inches by age 3 and 7.6 inches by age 7.

Other species sampled in low abundance were golden shiner, pumpkinseed, common carp, green sunfish, hybrid sunfish, and yellow bullhead. It is important to note that due to the State government shutdown, the 2011 assessment was conducted two weeks later than most of the previous assessments of Eagle Lake. It is unknown whether this affected the net catch of any species.

An assessment of fish in the shallow, nearshore habitats was also conducted using backpack electrofishing and seining. Fourteen species were sampled. Fish species not present in gill nets and trap nets were Johnny darter, bluntnose minnow, central mudminnow, brook silverside, banded killifish, blacknose shiner, and golden shiner. The purpose of the nearshore sampling is to calculate an Index of Biotic Integrity score. An Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is estimated based on all fish sampled in this assessment. The absence of sensitive species such as minnows and darters can contribute to a low IBI score. Eagle Lake contains several of these sensitive species; therefore, it scored 88.5 out of a maximum of 160, ranking it high compared to other lakes in the West Metro Area, but still indicating some impairment of water quality and habitat.


For more information on this lake, contact:

Area Fisheries Supervisor
7050 E Hwy 101, Suite 100
Shakopee, MN 55379
Phone: (952) 496-4141
Internet: West Metro Fisheries
E-Mail: MetroWest.Fisheries@state.mn.us

Lake maps can be obtained from:

Minnesota Bookstore
660 Olive Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
(651) 297-3000 or (800) 657-3757
No depth map available.


For general DNR Information, contact:

DNR Information Center
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4040
TDD: (651) 296-6157 or (888) MINNDNR
Internet: www.dnr.state.mn.us
E-Mail: info.dnr@state.mn.us

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