Minnesota Biological Survey: News from the Field 2014

Jeff Lee

Kyle Johnson,
Entomologist

Agassiz Lowlands
FFn67
FFn57
cardamine
creek
waldsteinia

click on images to enlarge

September 8th, 2014. "I surveyed moths, butterflies, and other insects at Minnesota Hill and Pine Creek Peatland which spans the border between Roseau County, Minnesota and southeastern Manitoba. This was a spontaneous stop en route between Kittson and Lake of the Woods counties.

I ran a rotten banana/brown sugar bait trail in the uplands and placed a UV light trap in a tamarack-black spruce rich swamp along the border path west of the hill. The latter was targeting a certain moth which is to be sought but never expected.

Weather was good that night (start at 59°F and low of 49°F) helped by clouds which also partially blocked out the moon (which is usually bad for moth activity). The UV sheet hardly produced anything despite this, but at least the bait trail was good with 35+ species which alone made the effort worthwhile; good moths included 2 Brachylomia discinigra,This link leads to an external site. 1 Eremobina claudens,This link leads to an external site. and many fresh Lithophane/Xylena.

In the morning I picked up the UV trap not expecting much given the poor catch at the sheet. But lo and behold right on the top was the moth I was seeking but certainly not actually expecting to catch- a single Papaipema awemeThis link leads to an external site.! This non-descript light brown "Holy Grail" of moths was previously known from only 8 specimens worldwide, ranging from Aweme Manitoba to the Lake Ontario shoreline of Rochester, New York. This new site (and first Minnesota record) lies 123 miles ESE of Aweme, Manitoba and 505 miles WNW of the Luce County Michigan site- that's quite a gap in the range!"

Border path through Pine Creek Peatland looking west.

UV light trap in Pine Creek Peatland looking east.

 

UV light trap in Pine Creek Peatland looking west.

UV sheet on Minnesota Hill along Minnesota-Manitoba border.

Moth catch from UV light trap.


Jeff Lee

Ethan Perry,
Plant
Ecologist/
Botanist

Border Lakes
FFn67
FFn57
cardamine
creek
waldsteinia

click on images to enlarge

June, 2014. "I stopped at the St. Louis River north of Toivola to check out the forest along the river. There were some beautiful bur oaks in the 70-80 cm diameter range. Given the high level of the river, it was easy to distinguish the true floodplain forest (FFn67) from the terrace forest (FFn57): the floodplain was under water. At the edge between the two types was an abundance of plant species common farther south, but unusual that far north, such as Virginia spring beauty (Claytonia virginica), two-leaved miterwort (Mitella diphylla), Virginia waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum), cut-leaved toothwort (Cardamine concatenata), and trout lily (Erythronium sp.).

Several miles upriver, south of Biwabik, in a dry jack pine-dominated forest, barren strawberry (Waldsteinia fragarioides) was in full bloom. I can also report that the mosquito population is abundant".

 

 

 

Northern Floodplain Forest (FFn67) doing its thing.

Just above the floodplain in the Northern Terrace Forest (FFn57) ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) forms a brilliant green layer.

Cut-leaved toothwort (Cardamine concatenata) farther north than its typical range.

The wet spring has water rushing through intermittent creeks that are usually dry.

Barren strawberry (Waldsteinia fragarioides) in full bloom in a jack pine forest.


 

 

 

 

 

News from the Field 2013