Fisheries Lake Survey

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Name: Campbell

Nearest Town: Puposky
Primary County: Beltrami
Survey Date: 06/20/2011
Inventory Number: 04019600
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Public Access Information

Ownership Type Description
DNR Concrete Public access on SE shore


Lake Characteristics

Lake Area (acres): 461.92
Littoral Area (acres): 222
Maximum Depth (ft): 25
Water Clarity (ft): 11.7

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A


Did you know? MinnAqua Fishing: Get in the Habitat! has a Minnesota-base activity guide for teachers, scout and 4-H leaders, youth leaders, outdoor sports groups, or anyone interested in teaching others about habitat, stewardship and fishing.

Fish Sampled for the 2011 Survey Year

Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Crappie Gill net 0.22 0.8 - 8.4 0.40 0.1 - 0.3
Bluegill Trap net 0.33 5.9 - 43.3 0.58 0.1 - 0.3
Gill net 0.44 N/A 0.21 N/A
Bowfin (dogfish) Trap net 1.56 0.3 - 1.1 5.43 3.0 - 4.5
Brown Bullhead Gill net 0.56 0.5 - 5.5 1.19 0.4 - 1.0
Largemouth Bass Trap net 0.44 0.3 - 1.0 2.93 0.3 - 1.2
Northern Pike Trap net 3.44 N/A 1.77 N/A
Gill net 9.89 2.3 - 9.2 1.64 1.5 - 2.7
Pumpkinseed Trap net 0.56 1.5 - 9.1 0.13 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 0.44 N/A 0.21 N/A
Rock Bass Trap net 0.22 0.3 - 1.0 0.52 0.2 - 0.6
Gill net 0.22 0.3 - 1.1 0.54 0.2 - 0.5
Tullibee (cisco) Gill net 0.11 0.9 - 4.4 0.74 1.3 - 1.8
Walleye Trap net 0.11 0.3 - 0.8 3.86 1.0 - 3.6
Gill net 3.56 1.2 - 5.3 1.11 1.1 - 2.6
White Sucker Trap net 0.22 0.3 - 1.3 3.09 1.6 - 2.9
Gill net 1.89 0.5 - 3.3 2.52 1.6 - 2.4
Yellow Bullhead Trap net 4.89 2.4 - 9.1 0.97 0.5 - 0.8
Gill net 1.78 1.0 - 8.0 0.90 0.4 - 0.7
Yellow Perch Gill net 4.78 3.7 - 28.4 0.09 0.1 - 0.2
Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.


Length of Selected Species (Trapnet, Gillnet) Sampled for the 2011 Survey Year

Species Number of fish caught in each category (inches)
0-5 6-8 9-11 12-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30+ Total
black crappie 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
bluegill 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
bowfin (dogfish) 0 0 0 0 0 6 8 0 14
brown bullhead 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 5
largemouth bass 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4
northern pike 0 0 0 0 55 61 4 0 120
pumpkinseed 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 9
rock bass 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 4
tullibee (cisco) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
walleye 0 1 3 20 7 1 1 0 33
white sucker 0 2 1 0 12 4 0 0 19
yellow bullhead 0 3 39 18 0 0 0 0 60
yellow perch 34 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 43


For the record, the largest Black Crappie taken in Minnesota weighed 5 lbs. and was caught:

    Where: Vermillion River, Dakota County
    When: 1940
    Statistics: 21" length

Fish Stocking Activity

Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years

Year Species Size Number Pounds
2012 Walleye yearlings 3,648 272.0
2010 Walleye adults 971 280.0
  Walleye yearlings 783 29.0
2008 Walleye yearlings 480 25.0
  Walleye fingerlings 13,936 208.0
2006 Walleye fingerlings 7,214 185.0
  Walleye yearlings 128 37.0
2004 Walleye fingerlings 18,913 298.0

Stocking Notes
1 - indicates fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.
2 - indicates fish purchased by the DNR for stocking.

Stocking Fish Sizes
Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.
Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.
Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.
Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines

No fish consumption guidelines are available for this lake. For more information, see the "Fish Consumption Advice" pages at the Minnesota Department of Health.


Status of the Fishery (as of 06/20/2011)

Campbell Lake is a 475-acre lake with a maximum depth of 25 feet located 12 miles northwest of Bemidji in Beltrami County. Campbell is one of eleven connected lakes known as the Turtle River Chain, although navigation between all lakes in the chain is not possible with much more than a canoe. Public access consists of a concrete boat ramp with parking for about six trucks/trailers located on the south shore of the lake. Anglers should consult a county road map, as the access is well off the beaten path down a series of gravel roads. Development of Campbell Lake is low, with a handful of lake homes and one small resort situated along the mostly bog shoreline. The fish community of Campbell Lake consists primarily of panfish (including black crappie), northern pike, walleye, largemouth bass, yellow perch, sucker/redhorse and bullhead species.

Campbell Lake northern pike were managed from 2003-2011 with a 24 to 36-inch protected slot limit, intended to improve the average size of northern pike and reduce the abundance of small pike in the population. Due to Legislative action in 2011 that limited the total number of northern pike special regulation lakes statewide, Campbell was dropped from the list of lakes managed with special regulations. The Campbell Lake regulation was selected for removal due to the lack of measured improvement in the pike population, although fisheries managers would have preferred a longer timeframe to evaluate the regulation's impact. The special regulation for northern pike remains in place on the remainder of the lakes in the Turtle River Chain. Although the gill net catch rate declined from 17.2/GN in 2007 to 9.9/GN in 2011 (one of the goals of the regulation was to reduce overall pike abundance), the population continues to be dominated by small fish, with an average size of 20.1 inches and 1.6 pounds/fish. Abundance of forage species such as yellow perch and tullibee are currently at low levels in Campbell Lake, and growth rates of pike have declined since 2007. While the Campbell Lake pike population will keep anglers busy with plenty of action (use a wire leader), those seeking an opportunity to catch larger pike may want to focus their efforts on other lakes in the Turtle River chain that currently hold better populations.

Over the years, Campbell Lake has been a consistent producer of bluegill, pumpkinseed sunfish and black crappie. In fact, at one time the state record pumpkinseed was from Campbell Lake, and fish up to 10 inches in length are still caught by anglers occasionally. The 2011 population assessment caught very few fish of these species, but this was due to extremely variable and cold weather during the late spring assessment timeframe and not because of low numbers of fish in the population. Panfish habitat in Campbell Lake is excellent, with extensive bulrush stands and submerged vegetation. Sharp drop-offs to deeper water provide good areas for anglers to focus on black crappie, although these fish utilize weedlines during spring and summer as well.

Campbell Lake is stocked with walleye fingerlings on alternating years. Natural reproduction is difficult to evaluate due to Campbell's connection to other lakes in the Turtle River Chain, which is a fairly open system. Walleye were captured at 3.6/GN in the 2011 population assessment, which is up from 2.9/GN in 2007 and above the median value of 2.8/GN for class 34 lakes. Walleye up to 25 inches in length were present in the catch. The walleye catch was dominated by age-2 and age-3 fish. Age-3 walleye had an average length of 12.3 inches, and these fish will provide good angling opportunity for "eater" size walleye in the next few years. Classic walleye structure (points, humps) is limited in Campbell Lake, so anglers should not forget about weedlines that can hold walleye during the summer and early fall.

Although no assessments have been conducted on the lake's bass population, Campbell does contain a good population of largemouth bass. Largemouth bass fishing in the Bemidji area is often overshadowed by high quality opportunities for walleye and muskellunge, but many lakes in the area offer good largemouth bass populations that are lightly fished, and Campbell Lake is a fine example. Bass anglers that put in the effort on Campbell may find that they have the lake all to themselves.


For more information on this lake, contact:

Area Fisheries Supervisor
2114 Bemidji Ave
Bemidji, MN 56601
Phone: (218) 308-2339
Internet: Bemidji Fisheries
E-Mail: Bemidji.Fisheries@state.mn.us

Lake maps can be obtained from:

Minnesota Bookstore
660 Olive Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
(651) 297-3000 or (800) 657-3757
To order, use C2542 for the map-id.


For general DNR Information, contact:

DNR Information Center
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4040
TDD: (651) 296-6157 or (888) MINNDNR
Internet: www.dnr.state.mn.us
E-Mail: info.dnr@state.mn.us

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