Fisheries Lake Survey

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Name: Victoria

Nearest Town: Alexandria
Primary County: Douglas
Survey Date: 06/11/2012
Inventory Number: 21005400
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Public Access Information

Ownership Type Description
DNR Concrete


Lake Characteristics

Lake Area (acres): 416.81
Littoral Area (acres): 122
Maximum Depth (ft): 60
Water Clarity (ft): 10.4 (7.8-13)

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A


Did you know? Fishing piers are installed on lakes to provide opportunities for shore fishing.

Fish Sampled for the 2012 Survey Year

Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Bullhead Gill net 0.11 0.6 - 9.5 1.38 0.5 - 0.8
Black Crappie Trap net 2.22 0.7 - 3.2 0.28 0.2 - 0.5
Gill net 2.33 0.5 - 2.7 0.64 0.2 - 0.4
Bluegill Trap net 9.44 5.6 - 42.3 0.16 0.1 - 0.3
Gill net 2.78 N/A 0.40 N/A
Bowfin (dogfish) Trap net 0.33 0.4 - 1.0 5.64 3.1 - 4.8
Brown Bullhead Gill net 0.11 0.3 - 2.2 1.05 0.6 - 1.0
Common Carp Trap net 0.67 0.2 - 1.1 4.14 3.0 - 7.8
Gill net 2.00 0.2 - 1.7 3.66 2.1 - 9.8
Common Shiner Trap net 0.22 N/A 0.08 N/A
Hybrid Sunfish Trap net 0.56 N/A 0.30 N/A
Largemouth Bass Trap net 0.56 0.3 - 1.1 1.33 0.2 - 0.9
Gill net 1.11 0.3 - 1.2 0.77 0.5 - 1.1
Northern Pike Trap net 0.22 N/A 2.60 N/A
Gill net 3.11 3.1 - 8.5 1.82 1.5 - 2.7
Pumpkinseed Trap net 0.11 1.7 - 8.2 0.27 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 0.11 N/A 0.25 N/A
Redhorse Gill net 0.22 N/A 1.33 N/A
Rock Bass Trap net 0.67 0.6 - 2.5 0.26 0.2 - 0.5
Gill net 1.56 0.3 - 2.0 0.28 0.3 - 0.5
Shorthead Redhorse Gill net 0.11 0.2 - 1.2 3.73 1.1 - 2.5
Smallmouth Bass Gill net 0.33 0.2 - 1.0 0.46 0.7 - 1.9
Walleye Trap net 0.56 0.2 - 0.7 0.70 0.9 - 2.9
Gill net 9.67 1.3 - 5.5 1.03 1.2 - 2.4
White Sucker Trap net 0.11 0.2 - 1.0 3.42 1.7 - 2.9
Gill net 0.56 0.5 - 3.5 1.80 1.6 - 2.4
Yellow Bullhead Trap net 1.89 1.5 - 7.7 1.06 0.5 - 0.8
Gill net 4.33 0.9 - 10.0 0.96 0.5 - 0.7
Yellow Perch Trap net 1.33 0.5 - 2.7 0.11 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 0.56 2.5 - 24.2 0.11 0.1 - 0.2
Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.


Length of Selected Species (Trapnet, Gillnet) Sampled for the 2012 Survey Year

Species Number of fish caught in each category (inches)
0-5 6-8 9-11 12-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30+ Total
black bullhead 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
black crappie 8 16 13 4 0 0 0 0 41
bluegill 40 69 1 0 0 0 0 0 110
bowfin (dogfish) 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3
brown bullhead 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
common carp 0 0 0 0 14 8 2 0 24
common shiner 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
hybrid sunfish 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
largemouth bass 1 2 7 4 1 0 0 0 15
northern pike 0 0 0 0 18 10 2 0 30
pumpkinseed 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
redhorse 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2
rock bass 8 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 20
shorthead redhorse 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
smallmouth bass 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 3
walleye 0 12 21 24 29 6 0 0 92
white sucker 0 0 1 0 4 1 0 0 6
yellow bullhead 0 2 23 31 0 0 0 0 56
yellow perch 7 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 17


For the record, the largest Black Crappie taken in Minnesota weighed 5 lbs. and was caught:

    Where: Vermillion River, Dakota County
    When: 1940
    Statistics: 21" length

Fish Stocking Activity

Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years

Year Species Size Number Pounds
2013 Walleye fingerlings 3,268 123.0
  Walleye* fingerlings 4,200 120.0
2012 Walleye yearlings 1,875 125.0
  Walleye* fingerlings 1,440 120.0
2011 Walleye fingerlings 2,570 135.0
2010 Walleye* fingerlings 1,200 120.0
  Walleye fingerlings 1,878 122.0
2009 Walleye fingerlings 2,440 122.0
  Walleye* fingerlings 2,640 120.0
2008 Walleye fingerlings 5,356 131.0
  Walleye* yearlings 3,600 120.0
  Walleye* fingerlings 4,200 120.0
2007 Walleye* fingerlings 1,536 120.0
2006 Walleye adults 90 105.0
  Walleye yearlings 30 15.0
  Walleye* fingerlings 1,995 133.0
2005 Walleye adults 77 77.0
  Walleye yearlings 128 51.0

Privately Stocked Fish
* indicates privately stocked fish. Private stocking includes fish purchased by the DNR for stocking and fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.

Stocking Fish Sizes
Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.
Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.
Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.
Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines

These fish consumption guidelines help people make choices about which fish to eat and how often. Following the guidelin es enables people to reduce their exposure to contaminants while still enjoying the many benefits from fish.

Pregnant Women, Women who may become pregnant and Children under age 15

LAKE NAME
County, DOWID
Species Meal Advice Contaminants
Unrestricted 1 meal/week 1 meal/month Do not eat
VICTORIA
Douglas Co., 21005400
Bluegill Sunfish   All sizes     Mercury
Bullhead   All sizes     Mercury
Crappie   All sizes     Mercury
Northern Pike     All sizes   Mercury
Walleye     All sizes   Mercury

General Population

LAKE NAME
County, DOWID
Species Meal Advice Contaminants
Unrestricted 1 meal/week 1 meal/month Do not eat
VICTORIA
Douglas Co., 21005400
Bluegill Sunfish All sizes        
Bullhead   All sizes     Mercury
Crappie All sizes        
Northern Pike   All sizes     Mercury
Walleye   All sizes     Mercury

DOWID - MN DNR, Division of Waters' lake ID number.

Contaminants listed were measured at levels that trigger advice to limit consumption.

Listing of consumption guidelines do not imply the fish are legal to keep, MN DNR fishing regulations should be consulted.

Dioxin
Mercury
PCBS - Polychlorinated biphenyls
PFOS - Perfluorooctane sulfanate


Status of the Fishery (as of 06/11/2012)

Lake Victoria is a 419 acre, horseshoe-shaped basin located on the eastern city limits of Alexandria. It is the most southern or upstream basin comprising the Alexandria Chain of Lakes. Navigable connections exist to Geneva and Jessie lakes. These connecting channels are shallow and could be problematic for deep draught boats. A concrete public access is located on the south shore off of County Road 23. A handicapped-accessible public fishing pier, which is a very popular destination for shore anglers, is located adjacent to the public access. The shoreline of Lake Victoria is highly developed and steeply sloped. The lake bottom is also steeply sloped, resulting in rapid drop-offs close to shore and limited shallow water habitat. The unique shape of this basin (i.e., a narrow horseshoe) makes it less susceptible to wave action and is often utilized as a calm retreat by both anglers and recreational boaters on windy days. Water quality and clarity are considered good. Water transparency readings often exceed 9.0 feet during summer months. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) water transparency data depicts a modest trend towards increased water clarity from the late 1970's until 2005.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources designated Lake Victoria as infested water after the discovery of zebra mussels in 2010. Minnesota statutes require all equipment be free of invasive species prior to leaving any access. All water must be drained from boats and bait containers before leaving the lake. Consult your current fishing regulations handbook for rules and regulations pertaining to the cleaning of equipment.

As a result of Lake Victoria being designated as infested water, the 2012 survey was delayed from mid- June to early-August in order to scheduled surveys on Lake Victoria and other infested basins after surveys in non-infested lakes were completed. Rescheduling the survey into late summer influenced sampling efficiency and catch rates of many gamefish species due to higher water temperatures, establishment of a thermocline, and vegetation establishment. There proved to be sufficient divergence in catches of walleye, northern pike, bluegill, black crappie, and yellow perch between June survey statistics and the August survey results to disallow direct comparisons of catch rates, age structure, and size distribution of population samples among surveys.

Walleye proved to be moderately abundant in partial response to annual and increased stocking. Most walleyes captured were young fish. Average length at time of capture was 13.9 inches. Northern pike abundance is low in comparison to other lakes making up the Alexandria Chain of Lakes. A gillnet catch rate of 3.1-pike/net and relatively small average size of fish captured are considered conservative estimates of population abundance and size distribution. Pike are a cool water fish. Larger pike could be expected to occupy cool water near the thermocline and are not vulnerable to capture in warm, shallow areas of the lake. The largest northern pike caught measured 28.2 inches. The largemouth bass population is sampled by electrofishing during spring, thus catches among surveys can be compared with a reasonable certainty of accuracy. Largemouth bass abundance, average size, and age distribution have declined with loss of old, and strong year classes established during the late-90s and early-2000s. This popular gamefish is still moderately abundant, but average size of largemouth bass captured was 9.4 inches. Only six of 35 12-inch and larger bass exceeded 16.0 inches. Anglers might also encounter smallmouth bass. This species was first sampled in 2008. Smallmouth bass appear to be expanding their distribution within the Alexandria Chain of Lakes and Douglas County.

Lake Victoria continues to support popular and productive black crappie and bluegill fisheries. Four age classes of crappie were captured in trapnets. Older and larger crappies were captured in gillnets in deeper, cooler water. Fifty-two percent of the gillnet catch exceeded 10.0 inches in length. Bluegill catches decreased greatly during the 2012 survey. A population decline is real and not a sole impact of survey timing. Very strong annual year classes were established between 1984 and 2003. Many of these old fish have been lost to old age and natural mortality. Fishing quality, in terms of average size, remains good due to progression of year classes established in the early 2000s. Most bluegill over 8.0 inches in length were captured in gillnets, indicating the larger fish were off shore and occupying the deep weed line. Average length of bluegills caught in gillnets was 7.9 inches.

Yellow perch catches were very low at only 0.6 fish/gillnet. Reduced catches were anticipated due to the later survey date, but a catch rate this low may suggest this very important prey population is in stress due to excessive predation. Most don't grow to a harvestable size since perch are maturing early in response to heavy predation rather than channeling available protein into body size.

Reductions in largemouth bass, bluegill, and yellow perch abundance are real rather than a simple response to survey timing. However, survey statistics continue to describe robust fishing opportunities. Lake Victoria is a good choice for fishing if wind and waves are high on larger lakes, but expect company.


For more information on this lake, contact:

Area Fisheries Supervisor
23070 North Lakeshore Dr
Glenwood, MN 56334
Phone: (320) 634-4573
Internet: Glenwood Fisheries
E-Mail: Glenwood.Fisheries@state.mn.us

Lake maps can be obtained from:

Minnesota Bookstore
660 Olive Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
(651) 297-3000 or (800) 657-3757
To order, use C1778 for the map-id.


For general DNR Information, contact:

DNR Information Center
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4040
TDD: (651) 296-6157 or (888) MINNDNR
Internet: www.dnr.state.mn.us
E-Mail: info.dnr@state.mn.us

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