Fisheries Lake Survey

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Name: Trout

Nearest Town: Coleraine
Primary County: Itasca
Survey Date: 08/12/2013
Inventory Number: 31021600
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Public Access Information

Ownership Type Description
Unknown Gravel
Township Gravel Located on the south end of the lake.
Private Property Concrete Located just south of KOM-ON-IN recreational area.
City Concrete Access located two blocks off of Hwy 169 at the swimming beach.


Fishing Regulations:

Special and/or Experimental Fishing Regulations exist on this lake. Please refer to our online Minnesota Fishing Regulations.

Fish Health:

Disease:Heterosporis sp.Date Tested:1/25/2007Result:Positive
Source: MNDNR

Lake Characteristics

Lake Area (acres): 1854.21
Littoral Area (acres): 438
Maximum Depth (ft): 135
Water Clarity (ft): 14.9 (12.8-17)

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A


Did you know? There are 15,000 miles of fishable streams in Minnesota, including 2,600 miles of trout streams.

Fish Sampled for the 2013 Survey Year

Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Crappie Trap net 0.47 0.3 - 1.7 0.26 0.3 - 0.6
Gill net 0.20 0.2 - 1.1 0.92 0.2 - 0.5
Bluegill Trap net 5.33 3.7 - 42.9 0.14 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 1.13 N/A 0.13 N/A
Bowfin (dogfish) Trap net 0.47 0.3 - 1.1 5.92 3.9 - 5.1
Gill net 0.13 0.1 - 0.2 6.46 3.0 - 5.2
Common Shiner Trap net 0.07 N/A 0.07 N/A
Golden Shiner Trap net 0.07 0.1 - 0.1 0.04 0.1 - 0.1
Hybrid Sunfish Trap net 0.40 N/A 0.07 N/A
Gill net 0.07 N/A 0.46 N/A
Largemouth Bass Trap net 0.40 0.4 - 1.4 0.12 0.3 - 0.7
Gill net 0.20 0.3 - 1.2 2.09 0.6 - 1.0
Northern Pike Gill net 2.93 3.0 - 7.9 3.66 1.7 - 2.8
Pumpkinseed Trap net 0.27 1.6 - 6.9 0.11 0.1 - 0.3
Gill net 0.40 N/A 0.31 N/A
Rock Bass Trap net 1.80 0.7 - 3.3 0.11 0.2 - 0.5
Gill net 8.60 1.0 - 6.6 0.40 0.3 - 0.5
Smallmouth Bass Trap net 0.20 0.1 - 0.6 0.09 0.1 - 0.6
Gill net 5.13 0.2 - 0.9 1.64 0.9 - 1.8
Tullibee (cisco) Gill net 0.13 0.5 - 5.2 2.34 0.4 - 1.0
Walleye Trap net 0.33 0.3 - 0.9 2.92 1.0 - 2.2
Gill net 10.80 4.0 - 9.6 2.06 1.1 - 1.9
White Sucker Gill net 1.53 1.0 - 3.5 1.09 1.5 - 2.3
Yellow Bullhead Trap net 0.07 0.9 - 4.8 1.10 0.7 - 1.0
Yellow Perch Trap net 6.07 0.7 - 3.7 0.11 0.1 - 0.2
Gill net 52.40 7.1 - 33.9 0.12 0.1 - 0.2
Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.


Length of Selected Species (Trapnet, Gillnet) Sampled for the 2013 Survey Year

Species Number of fish caught in each category (inches)
0-5 6-8 9-11 12-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30+ Total
black crappie 3 1 4 2 0 0 0 0 10
bluegill 67 28 2 0 0 0 0 0 97
bowfin (dogfish) 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 0 9
common shiner 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
golden shiner 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
hybrid sunfish 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
largemouth bass 4 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 9
northern pike 0 0 0 0 3 23 14 4 44
pumpkinseed 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
rock bass 66 56 34 0 0 0 0 0 156
smallmouth bass 5 13 14 14 34 0 0 0 80
tullibee (cisco) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2
walleye 0 6 27 29 39 65 1 0 167
white sucker 0 0 5 16 1 1 0 0 23
yellow bullhead 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
yellow perch 86 786 3 0 0 0 0 0 877


For the record, the largest Muskellunge taken in Minnesota weighed 54 lbs. and was caught:

    Where: Lake Winnibigoshish, Itasca County
    When: 1957
    Statistics: 56" length, 27.8" girth

Fish Stocking Activity

Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years

Year Species Size Number Pounds
2012 Walleye fry 1,417,500 13.5
2011 Walleye fry 1,417,500 12.4
2008 Walleye fry 1,100,000 11.0
2007 Walleye fry 1,890,000 18.9
2004 Walleye fry 1,890,000 18.9

Stocking Notes
1 - indicates fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.
2 - indicates fish purchased by the DNR for stocking.

Stocking Fish Sizes
Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.
Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.
Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.
Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines

These fish consumption guidelines help people make choices about which fish to eat and how often. Following the guidelin es enables people to reduce their exposure to contaminants while still enjoying the many benefits from fish.

Pregnant Women, Women who may become pregnant and Children under age 15

LAKE NAME
County, DOWID
Species Meal Advice Contaminants
Unrestricted 1 meal/week 1 meal/month Do not eat
TROUT
Itasca Co., 31021600
Crappie   All sizes     Mercury
Largemouth Bass     All sizes   Mercury
Northern Pike     All sizes   Mercury
Smallmouth Bass     All sizes   Mercury
Walleye   shorter than 15" 15" or longer   Mercury
White Sucker   All sizes     Mercury

General Population

LAKE NAME
County, DOWID
Species Meal Advice Contaminants
Unrestricted 1 meal/week 1 meal/month Do not eat
TROUT
Itasca Co., 31021600
Crappie All sizes        
Largemouth Bass   All sizes     Mercury
Northern Pike   All sizes     Mercury
Smallmouth Bass     All sizes   Mercury
Walleye   All sizes     Mercury
White Sucker All sizes        

DOWID - MN DNR, Division of Waters' lake ID number.

Contaminants listed were measured at levels that trigger advice to limit consumption.

Listing of consumption guidelines do not imply the fish are legal to keep, MN DNR fishing regulations should be consulted.

Dioxin
Mercury
PCBS - Polychlorinated biphenyls
PFOS - Perfluorooctane sulfanate


Status of the Fishery (as of 08/12/2013)

Trout Lake is a large, fertile, class 22 lake located immediately south of Coleraine, Minnesota. As a result of industrial and municipal practices within the watershed, the lake has experienced tremendous changes in water quality and the fish community. In recent years, the lake has provided a quality northern pike and walleye fishery. The 2011 lake management plan indicates walleye and northern pike as the primary species of management with black crappie, largemouth bass and smallmouth bass as secondary species. In 2005, a 17 to 26 inch protected slot length limit with only one fish over 26 inches in possession was implemented for walleye. The 2013 assessment included additional sampling of near shore fish species in order to calculate an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) score and these data are documented in a separate report.

The 2011 management plan indicates the goal for walleye is to maintain a gill net catch of 10 fish/net. The walleye gill-net catch rate was 9.9 fish/net in 2007, declined to 5.3 fish/net in 2010, and increased to 10.8 fish/net in 2013. The record high walleye catch in 2013 following the lowest catch in recent history (2010) provides an excellent example of the dynamic nature of fish populations. The sampled fish ranged from 7.9 to 25.8 inches and averaged 17.2 inches.

The 2013 assessment evaluated a period in which walleye were stocked in 1999-2001, 2003-04, 2007-08, and 2011-12. Although natural reproduction has been well documented on Trout Lake, the larger year-classes corresponded to stocked years in this assessment. Twelve year-classes were identified by scale, opercle and otolith analysis. Walleye averaged 14.2 inches at age 3, which was the same as in 2007. The slower growth observed in 2010 was likely in response to the two shorter and cooler growing seasons of 2008 and 2009. Growth has continued to be similar to the statewide averages.

The management plan goal for northern pike was to maintain a gill-net catch of 3.0 fish/net. Northern pike gill net catch rates have varied from 1.0 to 9.3 fish/net since 1946. Following the lowest catch on record (1.0 fish/net) in 2007, the catch improved to 2.5 and 2.9 fish/net in 2010 and 2013. Northern pike ranged from 19.2 to 31.3 inches and averaged 24.5 inches. For two consecutive assessments, only four age-classes were identified by scales and cliethra. The sampled fish ranged from age 2 to age 5. The age structure appears to indicate there is low but consistent recruitment. Fast growth, early maturation, and no older fish in two consecutive assessments may be an indication of angler over-harvest and should be monitored closely.

Black crappie are not sampled effectively in many lakes due to their behavior of suspending off the bottom away from shallow cover during the summer. The low population appears to be in response to the lake only having a few shallow, protected bays that are important for recruitment. The normal range for this lake class is 0.2 to 1.1 fish/gill net and 0.3 to 1.7 fish/trap net. The trap nets captured seven fish for a catch of 0.5 fish/net. Gill nets only sampled three fish for a catch rate of 0.2 fish/net compared to 0.1 fish/net in 2010. The fish that were sampled ranged from 4.5 to 13.2 inches. Age and growth information was not collected in this assessment.

Tullibees are difficult to sample with our standard summer gear due to their pelagic nature. As a result, tullibee catch rates are generally low but they can be highly variable. In 1946, the gill net catch rate was 23.3 fish/net and since that time catch rates have never been higher than 3.8 (1989). The decline may be a result of changes in water quality due to the land use practices within the watershed. In the last two assessments, the gill-net catch rate was 0.1 fish/net.

The yellow perch population has experienced major fluctuations over the years. The gill net catch rates increased from 20.3 in 1984 to 169.3 in 1999 over five assessments, then declined substantially to 28.6 fish/net in 2004. The catch of 52.4 fish/net in 2013 rebounded from the record low of 13.9 fish/net in 2010. Yellow perch lengths ranged from 4.3 to 9.9 inches and averaged 6.8 inches. Due to the yellow perch size structure, they are probably more important within the fish community as a competitor and prey source than as a species desired by anglers.

Other species observed during the assessment included bowfin, brown bullhead, common shiner, golden shiner, hybrid sunfish, largemouth bass, pumpkinseed sunfish, rock bass, smallmouth bass, white sucker, and yellow bullhead.

In order to maintain or improve fish and wildlife populations, water quality and habitat must be protected. People often associate water quality problems with large-scale agricultural, forestry, urban development or industrial practices in the watershed. In reality, the impact of land use decisions on one lake lot may be relatively small, yet the cumulative impact of those decisions on many lake lots can result in a significant decline in water quality and habitat. For example, removing shoreline and aquatic vegetation, fertilizing lawns, mowing to the water's edge, installing beach sand blankets, failing septic systems and uncontrolled run-off, all contribute excess nutrients and sediment which degrade water quality and habitat. Understanding these cumulative impacts and taking steps to avoid or minimize them will help to insure our quality fisheries can be enjoyed by future generations.


For more information on this lake, contact:

Area Fisheries Supervisor
1201 East Hwy 2
Grand Rapids, MN 55744
Phone: (218) 327-4430
Internet: Grand Rapids Fisheries
E-Mail: GrandRapids.Fisheries@state.mn.us

Lake maps can be obtained from:

Minnesota Bookstore
660 Olive Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
(651) 297-3000 or (800) 657-3757
To order, use B0240 for the map-id.


For general DNR Information, contact:

DNR Information Center
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4040
TDD: (651) 296-6157 or (888) MINNDNR
Internet: www.dnr.state.mn.us
E-Mail: info.dnr@state.mn.us

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