Carex laevivaginata    (Kukenth.) Mackenzie

Smooth-sheathed Sedge 


MN Status:
threatened
Federal Status:
none
CITES:
none
USFS:
none

Group:
vascular plant
Class:
Monocotyledoneae
Order:
Cyperales
Family:
Cyperaceae
Life Form:
graminoid
Longevity:
perennial
Leaf Duration:
deciduous
Water Regime:
wetland
Soils:
peat
Light:
full shade, partial shade
Habitats:

(Mouse over a habitat for definition)


Best time to see:

  Foliage   Flower   Fruit  
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Carex laevivaginata Carex laevivaginata Carex laevivaginata Carex laevivaginata Carex laevivaginata

Click to enlarge


Map Interpretation

Map Interpretation

  Synonyms

  Basis for Listing

Carex laevivaginata is a robust wetland sedge with wide but scattered distribution in the eastern half of the country. It reaches the northwestern limit of its range in southeastern Minnesota. Although it is more common farther east, it appears to be quite rare in Minnesota and rare or uncommon in adjacent states. The preferred habitat of C. laevivaginata in Minnesota is groundwater seeps in the Blufflands region in the southeastern corner of the state. These habitats are very rare, exceptionally fragile, and susceptible to disruptions in the flow of groundwater, even disruptions that may occur several miles from the habitat. For these reasons, C. laevivaginata was listed as a threatened species in Minnesota in 1996.

  Description

Carex laevivaginata has stout, tufted stems, and except for the distinctive leaf sheaths could easily be confused with the common C. stipata var. stipata (awl-fruited sedge). The leaf sheaths of C. laevivaginata are thickened at the mouth, often cartilaginous, yellowish in color, and are not cross-rugulose (Wheeler 1981; Gleason and Cronquist 1991). Carex laevivaginata also has the following characteristics: a compound inflorescence, perigynia (the structures that appear to be the seed or fruit but are actually bracts enclosing the ovary) that are 4-5 mm (0.2 in.) long, truncate and spongy at the base, and a beak that is 1-2 times the length of the body.

  Habitat

In the southern and eastern portions of its range, this species grows in swamps and woodland swales, in wet ravines, and along the muddy banks of creeks and rivers (Wheeler 1981). In Minnesota, C. laevivaginata seems to prefer cold, calcareous seepage flows or seepage-fed wet meadows, usually in narrow valleys along upper reaches of trout streams. In this setting, seeps and springs emerge on the valley floor, often at the base of a bluff where the valley has cut through specific bedrock strata. Undisturbed seeps are often represented by low mounds of organic matter (peat), which were formed by the groundwater activity. Seeps that support this species vary from those that have significant flowing water to those where the soil is merely moist. In addition to the immediate seepage zone, plants also occur along the groundwater outflow downstream from larger seeps, and less commonly along the moist banks of a nearby creek. Carex laevivaginata is often associated with Fraxinus nigra (black ash), Caltha palustris (common marsh marigold), the rare Floerkea proserpinacoides (false mermaid), and other Carex (sedge) species, sometimes including C. stipata var. stipata, with which it may be confused.

  Biology / Life History

Carex laevivaginata sends up its leaves in early spring at or just before the time it sends up fertile culms. Perigynia are shed by early summer, but the leaves, with their diagnostic sheaths, are present throughout the growing season.

The best time to search for this species is when C. laevivaginata is in fruit from late May through mid-July. When searching for this plant, one should be aware of its close resemblance to the common C. stipata, which may occur in the same habitat.

  Conservation / Management

The preferred habitat of C. laevivaginata is groundwater seeps in mature hardwood forests. These very rare and fragile habitats are vulnerable to disruption or diversion of groundwater flow. Disruptions can occur directly within C. laevivaginata habitat or several miles away, but both have the same effect of depriving the habitat of the water it needs. These are wetland habitats that require saturated conditions all year. Habitats have been known to survive short-term livestock grazing if grazing pressure is light. Cattle seem to avoid the unstable, peaty habitats if they can, but grazing is considered incompatible with ecologically responsible, long-term management of this habitat type. Populations of C. laevivaginata may survive a very limited amount of logging in the vicinity, but no studies have been done to document how much canopy removal the species can tolerate. The increased light and warming that results from even small openings created in the canopy are considered a potential threat to the stability of its habitat. Increased erosion and soil compaction that accompany heavy equipment use are additional threats. In addition, several C. laevivaginata populations have been damaged by unlawful off-road vehicle activity.

  Conservation Efforts in Minnesota

The Minnesota DNR County Biological Survey has been completed in southeast Minnesota. Several C. laevivaginata populations occur on State Forests and state Wildlife Management Areas. However, management plans for these areas must provide for the needs of this rare species and its habitat in order for its populations to persist.

  References

Ball, P. W., and A. A. Reznicek. 2002. Carex. Pages 254-572 in Flora of North America Editorial Committee, editors. Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 23. Oxford University Press, New York.

Gleason, H. A., and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. Second Edition. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

Minnesota County Biological Survey. 1994. Natural communities and rare species of Houston County. Biological Report No. 50. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Minnesota County Biological Survey. 1994. Natural communities and rare species of Winona County. Biological Report No. 49. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Ownbey, G. B., and T. Morley. 1991. Vascular plants of Minnesota: a checklist and atlas. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 320 pp.

Rosendahl, C. O., and J. W. Moore. 1947. A new variety of Sedum rosea from southeastern Minnesota and additional notes on the flora of the region. Rhodora 49:197-202.

Wheeler, G. A. 1981. A study of the genus Carex in Minnesota. Dissertation, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. 501 pp.