Natural resource planning tools


Best Management Practices to Remediate Shore Erosion

  1. Consult a shoreline restoration specialist and/or local soil and water conservation districts staff This link leads to an external site.Aquatic Habitat Restoration Grant Program to assess erosion type and damage and to develop a remediation plan.
  2. Use standard bioengineering practices such as biologs, live stakes from willow and dogwood (must be installed during the dormant season).
  3. Use seeds and plugs of aggressive native plant species, as appropriate for the region.
  4. Place coarse woody debris, such as brush bundles or logs to reduce wave action and allow natural regeneration of plants.
  5. Increase the wet meadow transitional zone through conservative re-grading of cut bank erosion.
Stabilized shore after installing staked biolog for bank protection, and erosion control blanket; planted with appropriate native plants. Photo: Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District Same site 1 year after installation. Careful weeding of invasive species at this stage is important. Photo: Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District

Stabilized shore after installing staked biolog for bank protection, and erosion control blanket; planted with appropriate native plants. Photo: Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District

Same site 1 year after installation. Careful weeding of invasive species at this stage is important. Photo: Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District

 
Stabilizing a river shoreline: (winter season) A cedar log revetment protects the shore from spring flows; the staked biolog protects against boat-generated waves; sediment deposition between biolog and cedar logs create a low terrace to facilitate natural regeneration of vegetation. Photo: Anoka Conservation District  Stabilizing a river shoreline: A cedar log revetment protects the shore from spring flows; the staked biolog protects against boat-generated waves; sediment deposition between biolog and cedar logs create a low terrace to facilitate natural regeneration of vegetation. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

Stabilizing a river shoreline: A cedar log revetment protects the shore from spring flows; the staked biolog protects against boat-generated waves; sediment deposition between biolog and cedar logs create a low terrace to facilitate natural regeneration of vegetation. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

 
Public water access before redevelopment, 400 feet of sandy abused shoreline. 4 years after restoration, 40 feet wide well established buffer planting.

Public water access before redevelopment, 400 feet of sandy abused shoreline.

4 years after restoration, 40 feet wide well established buffer planting.

 

Eroded impoverished shoreline. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

Conservative grading increases the wet meadow transition zone. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

Eroded impoverished shoreline. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

Conservative grading increases the wet meadow transition zone. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

Planting of native seedlings in aquatic, wet and upland zones. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District. 8 years later. Careful weeding over several years is essential for success. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

Planting of native seedlings in aquatic, wet and upland zones. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

8 years later. Careful weeding over several years is essential for success. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District.

 
Undercut shoreline before adding woody debris in 2006. Oak trees dropped at the shoreline in 2007.

Undercut shoreline before adding woody debris in 2006.

Oak trees dropped at the shoreline in 2007.

Same shoreline in 2012, accumulated sediment has repaired undercut and aided vegetation regeneration.  

Same shoreline in 2012, accumulated sediment has repaired undercut and aided vegetation regeneration.