Natural resource planning tools


Best Management Practices for Shores Dominated by Invasive Plants

  1. Consult a shoreline specialist and/or local soil and water conservation districts staff This link leads to an external site.Aquatic Habitat Restoration Grant Program to develop a detailed restoration and maintenance plan.
  2. Control invasive species and reintroduce appropriate native plants.
  3. Ensure that aquatic, wet meadow, and upland plant zones sustain dominant native plants appropriate by region (guided by DNR Operational Order 124, Plant Community Standard for native plant Community Restoration.)
  4. Prevent human disturbances by providing designated areas for shorefishing and/or build fishing piers.

Reed canary grass is one of the most common invasive plants along lakeshores and difficult to eradicate.

Annual weeds and invasive plants are cut to prevent re-seeding.

 
1 year old planting in need of maintenance. Photo: Anoka Conservation District 3 year old planting in need of weeding. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

1 year old planting in need of weeding annual and perennial invasive plants. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

2 year old planting still in need of weeding. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

Shoreline restoration with re-invading reed canary. Photo: Anoka Conservation District Restored shoreline buffer overtaken by Canada thistle.

3 year old planting in need of controlling re-invading reed canary grass. Photo: Anoka Conservation District

Shoreline buffer overtaken by Canada thistle.