Natural resource planning tools


Best Management Practices for Riprap Shores

  1. Consult a shoreline specialist and/or local soil and water conservation districts staff This link leads to an external site..
  2. Introduce aggressive native shoreline plants into riprap. Deep-rooted native plants will withstand the erosive forces of moving water, allow for sediment to accumulate which encourages natural vegetation regeneration.
  3. Reduce riprap shorelines on PWA sites.
Hard armor rock baskets were used as riprap shoreline treatments in the 1980s. Image showing an area after one year when a soil cap was installed and native seed and plugs planted to stabilize a shoreline.

Before: Hard armor rock baskets installed in the 80’s were too expensive to remove. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District

One year after a soil cap was installed and native seed and plugs planted. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District

 
Riprap before shoreline restoration. Shoreline restoration after 3 years. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District

Riprap shore before restoration. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District

Previous riprap shore 3 years after restoration. Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District

 
Failing retaining wall along a shore. Photo by Natural Shore Technologies. Photo by Natural Shore Technologies of a biolog for bank protection.

Failing retaining wall. Photo: Natural Shore Technologies

Installed biolog for bank protection with a planted buffer greatly improved this shoreline. Photo: Natural Shore Technologies

 
Riprap shore enhanced with brushbundles and live willow stakes.  

Riprap shore enhanced with brush bundles and live willow stakes will eventually improve habitat.