Natural resource planning tools


Treatment Best Management Practices

These best management practices address infiltration and filtration with or without an elevated underdrain.

Unlike end-of-pipe practices such as storm water ponds, bioretention areas are typically shallow depressions located in upland areas of a storm water treatment train. The strategic, uniform distribution of bioretention areas across a site results in smaller, more manageable catchment areas and will thus help in controlling runoff close to the source.

These structures represent the superior methods for water quality improvement (pollutant removal) and volume control, and should be applied whenever possible.

Bioretention Best Management Practices

Description of practice  »

Linear raingarden example.

Rain garden

illustrations

Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Conservation District

 
Bioretention cell example.

Bioinfiltration basin and biofiltration basin

illustrations

Photo: Ramsey-Washington Metro Conservation District

 

Permeable Pavement Best Management Practices

Permeable pavement sample called

These best management practices deal with the use of permeable concrete, permeable asphalt, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, crushed-rock, and/or turf-filled pavement systems with permeable base courses and/or amended subsoils.

Description of practice  »

illustrations