How do I report an invasive terrestrial animal?

Invasive terrestrial (land-based) animals, generally fall in to two categories: insects or vertebrate animals (ex. birds, wild hogs).  This page lists key invasive animals of interest and who to report them to.

Report the following species:

Insects

Report new locations to Minnesota Department of Agriculture or call the “Arrest the Pest” phone number: 1-888-545-6684.
Species such as:

Vertebrate animals

Report to Minnesota Department of Natural Resources DNR Invasive Species Program, Laura Van Riper, Laura.Vanriper@state.mn.us and your local conservation officer or wildlife office.
Species such as:

 

If the species has not been recorded in your location, or if you are not sure what you have, or not sure if it is of interest, follow these steps:

1. Map it

Note where you found the species (city, street, mark on a map). If you have a GPS unit, you could take GPS coordinates.

2. Take photos or make a collection

If you have a digital camera, take photos of the species and the damage being caused.

For insects, collect a sample. You can kill the insect by placing it in a zip lock bag and freezing it. You can then take photos of the insect that can be sent in for identification. Retain the specimen in case it is needed to confirm identification. Label with specific location, date, your name.

For vertebrate animals (mute swans, feral hogs, etc.) take photos if possible.

3. Identification

Do you know what you have? Recources:

Need more help with identification?
For insects contact Susan Burks, Susan.Burks@state.mn.us or your local forest health or ECS specialist.

For vertebrate animals, contact Laura.Vanriper@state.mn.us and your local DNR wildlife office.

4. Who do I contact to report the species?

For insects listed above, contact the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

For animals, such as Eurasian swine or mute swans, contact Laura.Vanriper@state.mn.us and your local DNR wildlife office.

 

Other invasive species

Earthworms

If you are interested in sharing information on earthworms see Great Lakes Worm Watch for opportunities.