Lanesboro area

Fishing

Lakes


Fillmore County

Forestville Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, slimy sculpin, brook stickleback, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Forestville Creek is maintained as a wild trout stream and the last stocking of brown trout occurred in 1977.  This stream typically has around 100 brown trout >12 inches per mile. Total trout biomass is typically >250 lbs/acre.

Comments: Forestville Creek watershed has a relatively high gradient and this can be seen in the fast currents throughout the stream. The head spring is something to visit and is included in a state angling easement. Some of the water coming out of this spring cave originates from the South Branch Root River in the vicinity of Mystery Cave, where the river sinks into the ground. Stream temperatures rarely exceed 65° F even at the stream mouth. Extensive brown trout movements take place between Forestville Creek and the South Branch Root River where the larger trout will typically overwinter. This stream has one of the few Yellow Sally stonefly (Isoperla sp.) hatches in southeast Minnesota. All of Forestville Creek is under a state angling easement or state park ownership (2.59 miles).

Canfield Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, white sucker, and slimy sculpin

Management Plan: Canfield Creek is maintained as a wild trout stream and the last stocking of brown trout occurred in 1977. This stream typically has around 100 brown trout >12 inches per mile. Total trout biomass is typically >200 lbs/acre.

Comments: Canfield Creek watershed is also of relatively high gradient after the stream exits a large cave spring (Big Springs). A common cause of brown trout year class failure is early spring flooding throughout the watershed. Some of the earliest investigations on this stream occurred in the early 1920’s by Thaddeus Surber. Canfield Creek has had excellent hatches of assorted crane fly species and this explains the success of a crane fly larva fly pattern. Recently brook trout have made it into Canfield Creek from a stocking of Minnesota Wild brook trout upstream at Seven Springs on the South Branch Root River. All of the designated trout stream part of Canfield Creek is under a state angling easement or state park ownership (1.57 miles).

Etna Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, white sucker, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Etna Creek is maintained through an annual stocking of 2,500 brown trout fingerlings. A reintroduction of brook trout was completed in 2010. This stream typically has around 25 brown trout >12 inches per mile. Total trout biomass is typically >60 lbs/acre.

Comments: Some very large brown trout have been caught by anglers or sampled in our stream assessments on this stream. Etna Creek is important as a spawning area and coldwater source for the South Branch Root River. Etna Creek Aquatic Management Area is maintained as a pond fishery in the headwaters and is open to pubic hunting and fishing. Species present in these small ponds are bluegills, largemouth bass, white suckers, and black crappies. Most of Etna Creek is under a state angling easement (1.68 miles).

Spring Valley Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, common shiner, northern hog sucker, silver redhorse, golden redhorse, shorthead redhorse, central stoneroller, hornyhead chub, southern redbelly dace, bluntnose minnow, fathead minnow, blacknose dace, longnose dace, creek chub, fantail darter, Johnny darter, rainbow darter, brook silversides, brook stickleback, and common carp

Management Plan: Spring Valley Creek is maintained as a wild brown trout stream. Rainbow trout yearlings are stocked (1,500 annually) in the vicinity of the town of Spring Valley. This stream typically has around 50-60 brown trout >12 inches per mile with a total trout biomass of around 50-75 lbs/acre. Each year some very large brown trout are caught in this stream.

Comments: Excellent hatches of March Browns (Macaffertium vicarium) are noted most years and spinner falls of this mayfly have been noted that completely covered the water’s surface. Water temperatures appear to be limiting in some areas of the stream. There are several new (2013) state angling easements on Spring Valley Creek. The City of Spring Valley allows angling on some of its property in town and Good Earth Village allows angling on its property as long as you report to the front office and sign in.

South Branch Root River

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, slimy sculpin, brook stickleback, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: The South Branch Root River upstream and through Forestville State Park downstream to Carimona is maintained as a wild brown trout stream. The area downstream of Carimona past Preston is stocked with 58,000 brown trout fingerlings on a biennial basis. This area also receives 3,300 rainbow trout yearlings and 6,750 rainbow trout fingerlings. The area downstream of the Hwy 52 bridge (downstream of Preston) receives 130,000 brown trout fingerlings annually with 2,250 rainbow trout yearlings and 5,850 rainbow trout fingerlings. Brook trout (22,000 fingerlings annually) are being stocked at Seven Springs, an area at the upstream most end of the designated trout water.

Comments: The South Branch Root River is an underutilized trout resource in southeast Minnesota. Excellent hatches of March Browns, Light Hendrickson’s, and multiple caddis fly species can be found on this river. Because of the size of the water, angler access can be had using a canoe or drift boat downstream of Preston. However, because of the access with the Root River State Trail, anglers can easily walk long distance to obtain access to easily wade-able areas. The South Branch has numerous state angling easements and areas of state park ownership. Please consult the stream maps for more detailed information.

Camp Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, rainbow trout, white sucker, creek chub, slimy sculpin, brook stickleback, longnose dace, blacknose dace, Johnny darter, central stoneroller, bluntnose minnow, and fantail darter

Management Plan: Camp Creek is maintained as a wild brown trout stream. Rainbow trout yearlings (500) are stocked in a posted area for a kids fishing contest during the third Saturday of May each year. Rainbow trout yearlings (500) are also stocked in the lower 0.8 miles of the stream. The stream has an excellent brown trout population typically consisting of around 50 brown trout >12 inches per mile near the mouth increasing to around 200 brown trout >12 inches per mile in the upstream most angling easement area. Typically trout biomass is around 180 lbs/acre in this upstream end.

Comments: The watershed lacks the steep ravines common to other area streams. Habitat improvement projects have taken place in several areas. The Root River State Trail extends from Preston and follows much of this stream. Recent fish population assessments have indicated sufficient numbers of young-of-year brown trout to keep this stream on the wild trout stream list. Much of the stream towards its mouth is under state angling easement. Please consult the stream maps for more detailed information.

Willow Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, northern hog sucker, creek chub, hornyhead chub, common shiner, black bullhead, central stoneroller, Johnny darter, fantail darter, slimy sculpin, brook stickleback, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Willow Creek receives 12,500 brown trout fingerling stocked into the downstream reach (2.64 miles). Rainbow trout yearlings (400) are stocked throughout the summer in this same area.

Comments: Willow Creek flows into the South Branch Root River upstream of Preston. The stream has a marginal brown trout population with around 30 brown trout >12 inches per mile. Total trout biomass is usually around 100 lbs/acre in the area within a mile of the mouth. Willow Creek has approximately 1.3 miles of state angling easements.

Kedron Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, creek chub, southern redbelly dace, Johnny darter, rainbow darter, fantail darter, fathead minnow, shorthead redhorse, common shiner, spottail shiner, central stoneroller, northern hog sucker, green sunfish, brook stickleback, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Thaddeus Surber completed the first survey of Kedron Creek in 1924 and noted that high water temperatures were limiting to the fish life at the time. The designated trout water of Kedron Creek is relatively short at 0.89 miles. Upstream of this the stream is intermittent, flowing partial underground. Numbers of brown trout >12 inches is typically around 150/mile. Total trout biomass is usually around 100 lbs/acre. Kedron Creek receives 5,000 brown trout fingerlings annually. Kedron Creek is most likely a source of brown trout for Bear Creek. Management plan updates are scheduled for 2020.

Comments: Kedron Creek is currently managed using a catch-and-release, artificial lures/flies only regulation thus protecting the numerous large brown trout. A habitat improvement project was completed in 2009 in the angling easement area. Kedron Creek has limited state angling easements. Access to the mouth must be granted by the landowner.

Little Jordon Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, white sucker, sculpin sp., fantail darter, central stoneroller, brook stickleback, creek chub, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Little Jordon Creek receives 5,000 brook trout fingerlings annually in the headwaters. Brown trout fingerling stocking has ceased.

Comments: Once upstream in the valley of Little Jordon Creek trout habitat conditions greatly improve and trout populations increase. Intensive agricultural practices and warm stream temperatures in the lower section currently prevent the success of a trout population. Brown trout >12 inches in the upstream area is typically around 30/mile with a total brown trout biomass ranging from 170-395 lbs/acre. Brook trout numbers remain low at approximately 20-50 adults/mile. Little Jordon Creek is under state angling easements for the majority of its length (3.47 miles).

Lost Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, northern hog sucker, golden redhorse, black redhorse, common carp, creek chub, redside dace, southern redbelly dace, blacknose dace, longnose dace, common shiner, bigmouth shiner, bluntnose minnow, fathead minnow, central stoneroller, central mudminnow, green sunfish, Johnny darter, fantail darter, brook stickleback, and American brook lamprey.

Management Plan: Surber investigated Lost Creek in the fall of 1918 and described the springs as of considerable size. Brown trout fingerling stocking has been discontinued in the downstream reaches of Lost Creek because of excellent natural reproduction in recent years (1997-2004). A habitat improvement project was completed in 2012 in the state angling easement corridor and involves restoring the important spring flows in this area and sloping the stream banks.

Comments: Lost Creek is likely an important source of brown trout for the Middle Branch Root River and vice versa. The numbers of brown trout >12 inches/mile has only been calculated once during Lost Creek’s assessment history and that resulted in 179/mile in a downstream station. Total brown trout biomass has been increasing and was last estimated at 231 lbs/acre in the same station mentioned above.

Mill Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, hornyhead chub, creek chub, Johnny darter, fantail darter, fathead minnow, shorthead redhorse, golden redhorse, common shiner, northern hog sucker, smallmouth bass and green sunfish

Management Plan: Brown trout fingerling stocking in the upstream reach is now at 18,000 fish. Rainbow trout yearlings (1,000) are stocked throughout the summer in this same area. An additional 1,000 rainbow trout yearlings are stocked during the special fishing event held in Chatfield. Sprau’s tributary is now being managed as a brook trout stream after three reintroduction stockings annually of 1,000 brook trout fingerlings (MN Wild strain) in 2008-2010.

Comments: Mill Creek produces some very large brown trout each year. Total brown trout adults have been estimated to be around 200/mile within the 2005 habitat improvement project upstream of Cty 30. Numbers of brown trout >12 inches/mile was 65 in the last assessment.

Lynch Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, white sucker, bluntnose minnow, central mudminnow, central stoneroller, common shiner, creek chub, fathead minnow, Johnny darter, silver redhorse, shorthead redhorse, green sunfish and longnose dace

Management Plan: Stocking of brown trout fingerlings (5,500 annually) takes place in the downstream reach of Lynch Creek. Brook trout fingerlings (5,500) have been stocked annually since 2008 in the headwaters. During the last assessment of Lynch Creek in 2005 the typical range of brown trout >12 inches/mile was from 16 to 79 in several stations. Total trout biomass during that time was the greatest in the upstream reaches at around 175 lbs/acre.

Comments: A number of large brown trout routinely are caught in Lynch Creek. Access to the easement corridor is somewhat challenging in that it winds down the valley through a steep hillside.

Trout Run Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, rainbow trout, white sucker, shorthead redhorse, golden redhorse, black redhorse, northern hog sucker, central stoneroller, slimy sculpin, brook stickleback, creek chub, American brook lamprey, northern brook lamprey, common shiner, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Trout Run Creek is without doubt the most popular fly fishing trout stream destination in southeast Minnesota. Multiple access points and state angling easements along with relatively excellent hatches and habitat improvement work provide great opportunities. Trout Run Creek is a wild brown trout stream and was last stocked in 2002 downstream of Bucksnort Dam. Numbers of brown trout >12 inches typically exceeds 200/mile in most areas and has recently been as high as 452/mile in one station downstream of Bucksnort Dam. Multiple types of angling regulations have been used on Trout Run Creek with limited success. Currently the entire stream is managed using a protected slot (12-16 inches) with the use of artificial lures and flies only. Trout Run Creek has been the focus of cooperative habitat improvement projects with MNDNR Lanesboro Fisheries, Trout Unlimited and the Minnesota Trout Association during past years.

Comments: Please be respectful of others fishing as this stream can get crowded at times. Pick up your trash and any left by someone else. Dogs are not allowed in the easement corridor unless permission is granted by the landowner...this is a common complaint. Trout Run is known for its excellent caddis hatches.

Torkelson Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, shorthead redhorse, white sucker, bluntnose minnow, fathead minnow, common shiner, bigmouth shiner, river shiner, creek chub, southern redbelly dace, central stoneroller, Johnny darter, brook stickleback, longnose dace, and blacknose dace

Management Plan: Torkelson Creek has recently been stocked with Minnesota Wild strain brook trout (3,000 fingerlings annual 2008-2010). Wild brown trout management began in 1981. Estimates of abundance of brown trout >12 inches have been as high as 95/mile in past assessments. Total trout biomass is relatively low at <75 lbs/acre. In 2002, repairs were completed on a habitat improvement project conducted in 1978.

Comments: This stream sits in a beautiful little valley that is mostly pastured. Torkelson Creek flows directly into the North Branch Root River. The stream was originally surveyed by Surber in 1920.

Duschee Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, rainbow trout, golden redhorse, white sucker, creek chub, hornyhead chub, longnose dace, blacknose dace, common shiner, bigmouth shiner, golden shiner, bluntnose minnow, fathead minnow, central stoneroller, Johnny darter, and brook stickleback.

Management Plan: Duschee Creek is annually stocked with 23,500 brown trout fingerlings and 3,200 rainbow trout yearlings. Brook trout (Minnesota Wild strain) have been reintroduced in the headwaters successfully. Seven small habitat improvement projects have been completed on Duschee Creek. Numbers of brown trout >12 inches usually ranges between 13 and 46/mile in recent assessments. Total trout biomass is typically around 175 lbs/acre.

Comments: Duschee Creek is a popular destination for opening day anglers. Much of the stream is included in a state angling easement.  Some nice brook trout have been caught in the headwaters.

Gribben Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, white sucker, northern hog sucker, creek chub, longnose dace, blacknose dace, central stoneroller, slimy sculpin, and brook stickleback

Management Plan: Gribben Creek is a wild brown trout stream. Stocking was discontinued in 1980 due to the establishment of a natural reproducing population. Estimated numbers of brown trout >12 inches is typically around 30 to 80/mile though one station downstream of the first bridge had an estimated 311 brown trout >12 inches/mile in 2010. Total trout biomass ranges from 130 to 548 lbs/acre.

Comments: Much of Gribben Creek runs through state forest property and therefore has a very healthy riparian zone.  Gribben Creek is very important as a cold water source to the Root River which it flows into.  Brown trout routinely move between each stream depending on the season.

Diamond Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, white sucker, golden redhorse, common carp, creek chub, southern redbelly dace, longnose dace, blacknose dace, fathead minnow, central stoneroller, Johnny darter, fantail darter, and brook stickleback

Management Plan: The downstream end of Diamond Creek (1.05 miles) is considered warmwater and is not actively managed for trout. Once upstream of several springs in this area the stream becomes good trout water. The stream was originally surveyed by Surber in 1920. Diamond Creek has two forks, North Fork, which contains the majority of the flow, and South Fork. Both forks contain state forest properties. As stream habitat and flows improved over time (1950’s to present), brown trout began reproducing successfully and no stocking is currently required. Several habitat improvement projects were completed in the early 80’s.

Comments: Total brown trout biomass is very good (321 lbs/acre) in the area just downstream from where the two forks meet. Areas with the highest numbers of brown trout >12 inches/mile is in the most downstream easement on Diamond Creek (90/mile). Brook trout biomass is best (196 lbs/acre) in the upstream most areas of the North Fork. This area is also a good area to find some larger brookies (the estimate for those >10 inches was last at 10/mile).

Big Springs Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, American brook lamprey, white sucker, northern hog sucker, creek chub, southern redbelly dace, blacknose dace, longnose dace, common shiner, bigmouth shiner, fathead minnow, central stoneroller, green sunfish, blackside darter, Johnny darter, fantail darter, slimy sculpin, and brook stickleback

Management Plan: Brook trout have been reintroduced (Minnesota Wild strain) into the upstream areas of Big Springs Creek (5,000 fingerlings in 2008, 2009, and 2010). A habitat improvement project was completed in 1988/1989. Numbers of brown trout and brook trout are highest in the upstream most angling easement.

Comments: Some very nice browns have been sampled in Big Springs Creek. More than 2 miles of this stream is under state angling easement. Thick vegetation along the stream corridor may limit access during the summer months.

Schueler Creek

Species Present: Brown trout, brook trout, and brook stickleback

Management Plan: Maintaining Schueler Creek’s contribution of coldwater to Rush Creek is of utmost importance. Total brown trout biomass was around 98 lbs/acre with several fish >14 inches in the electrofishing station in 2011. Total brown trout biomass was around 120 lbs/acre.

Comments: Brook trout seem to be able to hold their own with brown trout present in this stream. In past assessments there were excellent numbers of brook trout.