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 Woodsia alpina    (Bolton) S.F. Gray

Alpine Woodsia 


MN Status:

special concern
Federal Status:
none
CITES:
none
USFS:
yes


Group:

vascular plant
Class:
Filicopsida
Order:
Filicales
Family:
Dryopteridaceae
Life Form:
forb
Longevity:
perennial
Leaf Duration:
deciduous
Water Regime:
terrestrial
Soils:
rock
Light:
partial shade
Habitats:

(Mouse over a habitat for definition)


Best time to see:

  Foliage   Flower   Fruit  
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Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina Woodsia alpina

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Map Interpretation

Map Interpretation

  Basis for Listing

There are a number of records of Woodsia alpina in Minnesota, but all are restricted to about 16 locations in Lake and Cook counties in the northeast corner of the state. All but two of the sites are along the shore of Lake Superior where development pressures are very great and increasing every year. Of particular concern are issues related to trail and road construction, recreational rock climbing, and timber management. These issues are especially problematic because most of the W. alpina locations contain only a few plants, and extirpations could occur as a result of even small disturbances. Woodsia alpina was listed as a special concern species in Minnesota in 1996, however, elevating its status to threatened is currently being considered.

  Description

The rhizome of W. alpina is erect and compact, with abundant, persistent petiole bases of +/- equal length. The frond is typically 15 cm (5.9 in.) high by 2 cm (0.8 in.) wide, and deciduous with a blade/stipe ratio of 2:1 to 3:1. The stipe has a persistent base, above which it articulates at a swollen node half way up. The stipe is brown or black when mature, and has red-brown lanceolate scales at the base. The blade is 1-pinnate-pinnatifid, narrowly lanceolate to ovate-lanceolate, broadest below the middle, herbaceous, and bright green, with long, fine, red-brown hairs. The pinnae consist of 8 to 15 pairs; the largest pinnae with 1-3 pairs of pinnules, the shorter ones merely fan-shaped. The margins are nearly entire, the veins free, simple or forked. The sori are round and located near the margin. The indusium has filamentous segments enveloping sorus.

  Habitat

Woodsia alpina is found in crevices and on small ledges of moist, partially shaded cliffs. The cliffs tend to be composed of non-acidic rock.

  Biology / Life History

Molecular studies indicate that W. alpina is an allotetraploid (fertile hybrid) that was derived from W. glabella (smooth woodsia) and W. ilvensis (rusty woodsia) (Windham 1993). It is a perennial, but it is not known how long individual plants may live.

The best time to search for W. alpina is when spores are present, from mid-June through September.

  Conservation / Management

Populations of W. alpina tend to be small and are usually restricted to specific portions of cliff features that may be separated from similar features by several meters or several kilometers. This makes it difficult to define populations and to delineate habitat. For this reason, it may be necessary to carefully inspect all potential habitats near known populations if any management or development is contemplated.

  Conservation Efforts in Minnesota

No known conservation efforts have been directed towards this species.

  References

Butters, F. K., and E. C. Abbe. 1953. A floristic study of Cook County, northeastern Minnesota. Rhodora 55:21-201.

Gerdes, L. B. 2001. A contribution to the flora of the Rove Slate Bedrock Complex Landtype Association, northern Cook County, Minnesota, USA. Thesis, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan. 79 pp.

Lakela, O. 1965. A flora of northeastern Minnesota. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 541 pp.

Lellinger, D. B. 1985. A field manual of the ferns and fern-allies of the U.S. and Canada. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. 389 pp.

Windham, M. D. 1993. Woodsia. Pages 270-280 in Flora of North America Editorial Committee, editors. Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 2. Oxford University Press, New York, New York.