Terrestrial invasive species


Most of these invasive plant factsheets are created from the booklet Minnesota invasive non-native terrestrial plants, an identification guide for resource managers.

Check the additional resources and herbicides table for more information.

Hoary alyssum (Berteroa incana)



Appearance: Annual, occasionally biennial herbaceous plant 1 1/2 - 2' tall with an erect branched downy stem.

Leaves: Alternate, small lance-shaped and covered with a grayish down.

Flowers: Tiny white flowers are arranged in elongated clusters along a central stem, each flower with four deeply divided petals; blooming June through August.

Seeds: Seeds are round to oblong narrowly winged.

Roots: Taproot.

Ecological Threat:

  • Hoary alyssum, a native of Europe, does not pose a threat to intact native grasslands at this time.
  • It displaces native species particularly in dry prairies and sand blowouts where vegetation is sparse. It is most abundant in disturbed dry areas, fields and waste places.
  • It can be a nuisance in prairie reconstruction but declines as prescribed burns are administered.


Control Methods:

Mowing, pulling and prescribed burning


Native Substitutes:

Additional Resources