Sparganium glomeratum    Laestad. ex Beurling

Clustered Bur-reed 


MN Status:
delisted
Federal Status:
none
CITES:
none
USFS:
yes

Group:
vascular plant
Class:
Monocotyledoneae
Order:
Typhales
Family:
Sparganiaceae
Life Form:
forb
Longevity:
perennial
Leaf Duration:
deciduous
Light:
full sun, partial shade
Habitats:

(Mouse over a habitat for definition)


Best time to see:

 Foliage Flower Fruit 
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Sparganium glomeratum Sparganium glomeratum Sparganium glomeratum Sparganium glomeratum Sparganium glomeratum Sparganium glomeratum

Click to enlarge

Sparganium glomeratum
Minnesota range map
Map Interpretation
North American range map
Map Interpretation

  Basis for Former Listing

Sparganium glomeratum is considered a circumboreal species, meaning it occurs in boreal regions around the world. Although this is true, it is perhaps misleading. The species is actually rare or absent from most of the boreal regions of the world, being common only in parts of northern Europe and Asia. In North America, it is found at several locations in Minnesota, a few sites in adjacent Wisconsin, and at scattered sites across Canada.

In fact, it appears there are more records of S. glomeratum from Minnesota than from the rest of North America combined. Current data would suggest that Minnesota is the North American stronghold of this species. However, it is quite likely that Minnesota botanists have simply done a more thorough job of finding this species. This puts conservation of S. glomeratum in Minnesota in a different perspective. Usually when Minnesota is at the edge of a species' range, the concern is how to protect the small outlier or disjunct populations. In this case, trying to protect the small core population is the issue. Sparganium glomeratum was listed as an endangered species in Minnesota in 1984. Several new records for this species led to it being reclassified as special concern in 1996.

  Basis for Delisting

Since 1996, the known populations of S. glomeratum have more than doubled and the type of habitats it has been documented in, none of which are particularly threatened, has broadened greatly. It is now understood to be much more common and widespread than it was once thought to be and special concern status is no longer necessary. Sparganium glomeratum was delisted in 2013.