Cheilanthes lanosa    (Michx.) D.C. Eat.

Hairy Lip-fern 


MN Status:
delisted
Federal Status:
none
CITES:
none
USFS:
none

Group:
vascular plant
Class:
Filicopsida
Order:
Filicales
Family:
Pteridaceae
Life Form:
forb
Longevity:
perennial
Leaf Duration:
evergreen
Water Regime:
terrestrial
Soils:
rock
Light:
full sun, partial shade
Habitats:

(Mouse over a habitat for definition)


Best time to see:

 Foliage Flower Fruit 
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Cheilanthes lanosa Cheilanthes lanosa

Click to enlarge

Cheilanthes lanosa
Minnesota range map
Map Interpretation
North American range map
Map Interpretation

  Synonyms

Cheilanthes vestita

  Basis for Former Listing

At this time, the existence of Cheilanthes lanosa in Minnesota is a matter of conjecture. The only documentation that bears on this question is a 19th Century herbarium specimen labeled "Dalles of the St. Croix". That description could place the location in Minnesota or Wisconsin. A fern specimen collected in Winona County, Minnesota in 1991 was initially thought to be this species, but was later revealed to be the closely related species C. feei.

If C. lanosa were actually discovered in Minnesota, it would likely be on dry, sunny limestone outcrops on steep, south or east-facing slopes in the southeast corner of the state. Any activity that would alter the growing conditions in such a sensitive habitat could threaten the survival of an indigenous population.

  Basis for Delisting

It is possible that authentic C. lanosa does occur in the state but the evidence at this time is too tenuous to justify it remaining on the state endangered species list. Cheilanthes lanosa was delisted in 2013.