Habitat table

Habitats used in the Rare Species Guide

Habitats are closely based on the Ecological Systems described for Minnesota's Native Plant Community Classification.

Upland Forests and Woodlands
 HabitatDescription
 

Fire Dependent Forest

Upland forests characterized by plants adapted to fire. Common canopy trees include pines, spruce, balsam fir, aspens, paper birch, and northern pin oak.
 

Mesic Hardwood Forest

Upland forests characterized by plants adapted to shade and rapid nutrient cycling. Sugar maple, basswood, northern red oak, and elm are important canopy trees.
Upland Grasslands, Shrublands and Sparse Vegetation
 HabitatDescription
 CliffSparsely vegetated communities on vertical to near-vertical exposures of bedrock.
 TalusSparsely vegetated communities on accumulations of coarse rocks and soils at the base of cliffs.
 Rock OutcropSparsely vegetated communities on exposed bedrock.
 Upland PrairieGrass-dominated communities on moderately well-drained to excessively drained soils. Broad-leaved herbs (forbs) are typically common.
 SavannaSparsely treed communities on moderately well-drained to excessively drained soils. Grasses often dominating the ground-layer, but broad-leaved herbs (forbs) and low shrubs also common.
 Lowland PrairieGrass-dominated treeless communities on poorly drained soils, usually in depressions or drainage-ways. Sedges are often nearly as common as grasses, and broad-leaved herbs (forbs) are typically common. Low shrubs are sparse to common.
 Lake ShoreNon-forested communities on clayey, silty, sandy, or rocky lake shores, typically in the zone between annual low water levels and the upper reach of storm waves and ice scouring.
 River ShoreNon-forested communities on clayey, silty, sandy, or rocky river shores, typically in the zone between annual low water levels and the upper limit of impacts from currents and ice scouring.
Wetland Forests
 HabitatDescription
 Floodplain ForestLowland forests on floodplains. Characterized by plants adapted to an annual flood cycle. Silver maple and cottonwood are the dominant canopy trees on many sites.
 Wet ForestLowland forests usually dominated by deciduous trees, especially black ash, in shallow basins and along shoreline where nutrient rich soils are saturated much of the year.
 Forested Rich PeatlandLowland forests on peat soils characterized by plants adapted to permanently waterlogged soils and water at nearly neutral pH. Canopy trees include white cedar, tamarack, and black spruce. More species rich than forested acid peatland.
 Forested Acid PeatlandStunted conifer forests on deep, well-developed sphagnum. Black spruce and tamarack are the predominant trees present.
Wetland, Grasslands, Shrublands and Marshes
 HabitatDescription
 Non-forested Acid PeatlandNon-forested communities on well-developed sphagnum characterized by plants adapted to permanently waterlogged, acid soils. Dominated by ericaceous shrubs.
 Non-forested Rich PeatlandNon-forested communities on peat soils characterized by plants adapted to permanently waterlogged soils and water at nearly neutral pH. Dominated by fine-leaved sedges and shrubs.
 Wet Meadow/CarrOpen wetlands on mineral or shallow peat soils. Either dominated by broad-leaved sedges or willows and dogwood.
 MarshShallow basin wetlands with emergent vegetation such as cattails and bulrushes.
Rivers and Streams
 HabitatDescription
 Small Rivers and StreamsRivers/streams 2.5-6.1 m in width.
 Medium Rivers and StreamsRivers/streams 6.2-12.1 m in width.
 Large RiversRivers 12.2 m or larger in width.
Lakes
 HabitatDescription
 Littoral Zone of LakeShallow areas of lakes where water mixes from top to bottom. Submersed aquatic plants often occupy this zone.
 Deep Water Zone of LakeDeep water areas of lakes where water forms layers separated by temperature.
Subterranean
 HabitatDescription
 SubterraneanTerrestrial, air-filled habitats, ranging from large caves to interstitial crevices below soil horizon.