Park improvements

Lakeview Campground

   

Lakeview Campground will soon undergo comprehensive infrastructure and facilities redevelopment to modernize the campground. 

At completion, the redeveloped campground will better meet the needs of visitors through improved roadways, larger campsites and updated historic buildings that meet current building standards and accessibility guidelines.

The work will begin in December 2023, and will last a full year.

Tent next to a structure in the old Lakeview Campground at Sibley State Park.
The old Lakeview Campground.

What will be open - or closed - to visitors during construction?

Open:

  • Oak Ridge Campground, with 34 electric sites and 23 non-electric sites;
  • The horse campground, with nine sites.
  • Recreational facilities adjacent to Lakeview Campground, including the swimming beach, fish cleaning shack, gift shop, picnic area and dock.
  • The bike trail adjacent to Lakeview Campground will remain open during much of the construction, but will need to be closed periodically to add additional picnic areas.  

Closed:

  • Lakeview Campground itself will be closed and not accepting reservations until the project is completed.
What all is being done, and why?

The layout of the roads and campsites will be redesigned with better spacing, turning radii and stormwater management. These changes are consistent with the park’s management plan as well as current standards for public safety, stormwater management, sensitive resource protection, accessibility and campsite spacing. 

Every effort has been made to maximize the number of campsites while adhering to these standards. Campground redesign will necessitate a reduction in the number of campsites from 71 (52 electric sites, 19 non-electric sites) down to 41 (40 electric sites, one non-electric site). 

All water, electric and sanitary sewer utilities in the campground will be replaced. 

The current RV dump station is in an upper corner of the campground, and its location often causes a traffic jam as campers depart. This project will remove the Lakeview Campground dump station and provide a new centrally located station for both Lakeview and Oak Ridge campground visitors to use. 

How will this impact the park's historic buildings?

Lakeview Campground is the site of a Veterans' Conservation Corps (VCC) camp from the 1930s. VCC members developed much of the park's infrastructure and buildings. The campground has four historic buildings with significant original stonework – two shower/restroom buildings, an enclosed picnic shelter/lodge and a water tower. The water tower does not need updates at this time, but the other three facilities will be renovated. 

Improvements to these facilities will stay true to their historic nature, but also incorporate current building code and accessibility upgrades. 

The roofs of the two shower buildings and the picnic shelter will be replaced, and the stonework will receive extensive tuckpointing. The concrete floors, countertops, and all fixtures (sinks, toilets, showers) will be replaced, as will the plumbing, electrical and sewer lines. The layout of the two shower/restroom buildings will be updated to maximize accessibility and offer individual gender-independent toilet and shower rooms. 

What about the trees in the campground?

Every effort was made to preserve as many trees as possible, but because all the utilities, roads and campsites are being replaced, mature trees will need to be removed. This includes several large ash trees that are expected to be killed by invasive emerald ash borers in the coming years. They will be replaced with a diverse set of tree species that will be more resistant to disease, harmful insects and climate events.

Many new trees will be planted as part of this project, but the new trees will take years to mature. This effort is an investment in the long-term health and diversity of the tree canopy. 

How is this project funded?

Funding for the project will come from the state's Parks and Trails Legacy Fund, the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund and Get Out MORE (Modernizing Outdoor Recreation Experiences)

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